Hatshetsup

posted in: Ships | 0

Scale model of one of the ships in the fleet of Queen Hatshepsut on her journey to Punt. This model was made following reproductions of antique engravings.

TECHNICAL DATA

Model’s Details

Name Hatshepsut
Description Ship of the fleet of Queen Hatshepsup on her journey to Punt.
Design Francisco Texeira
Scale ?
Measures (mm) Length: 280, Beam: 78, Height: 220
Construction 2010-2011
Hours 280
Details One of the difficulties I have faced with this model is that there are no plans. I’ve just used some drawings I got from internet and some pictures of this ship made by some modellers.

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS

Photos of the building process

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HISTORY

History


Hatshepsut (meaning Foremost of Noble Ladies; 1508–1458 BC) was the fifth pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of Ancient Egypt. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty.

Although contemporary records of her reign are documented in diverse ancient sources, Hatshepsut was described by early modern scholars as only having served as a co-regent from about 1479 to 1458 BC, during years seven to twenty-one of the reign previously identified as that of Thutmose III. Today it is generally recognized that Hatshepsut assumed the position of pharaoh and the length of her reign usually is given as twenty-two years, since she was assigned a reign of twenty-one years and nine months by the third-century BC historian, Manetho, who had access to many records that now are lost. Her death is known to have occurred in 1458 BC, which implies that she became pharaoh circa 1479 BC.

Hatshepsut built a Red Sea fleet to facilitate trade between the head of the Gulf of Aqaba and points south as far as Punt to bring mortuary goods to Karnak in exchange for Nubian gold. Hatshepsut personally made the most famous ancient Egyptian expedition that sailed to Punt. During the reign of Queen Hatshepsut in the 15th century BC ships regularly crossed the Red Sea in order to obtain bitumen, copper, carved amulets, naptha and other goods transported overland and down the Dead Sea to Elat at the head of the gulf of Aqaba where they were joined with frankincense and myrrh coming north both by sea and overland along trade routes through the mountains running north along the east coast of the Red Sea.

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