Sanson (tug)

posted in: Ships | 0

El Samson is a kit by Artesanía Latina. The original ship was a steam-powered tall tug that carried out support and rescue tasks for large ships in the Atlantic. It is a large scale model (61cm long) and easy to build, as it has a fairly “clear” deck compared to other boats.

TECHNICAL DATA

Technical Data

Name Sansón
Description High seas tug
Design Artesanía Latina
Scale 1:40
Measures (cm) Length: 61, Beam: 14, Height: 35
Date 2000
Hours 220
Comments Large model, appropriate for beginners, except for the curving of the wooden boards covering the hull.
PHOTOS

Photos 

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HISTORY

History

Old steam-powered tug.

It can be said that there are two main types of tugs: those serving in sea-port and those on high seas. Within these two groups and even between them there are numerous local types, as well as of different dimensions and power.

The “Samson” is a tall tug from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Its engine was powered by a steam boiler, which could develop 2000HP of power and a speed of 14 knots. It had very large fenders in the bow and on the sides, generally, his job was not to tow, but to “push” the Atlantic giants.

Among the most famous high-seas tugs are those responsible for the rescue of the St. Andrew passengers who, during a hurricane on January 8, 1839, capsized on the coasts of Liverpool.

Samuel Walters’ painting illustrates this heroic action.

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